Category Archives: minimalism

Spiritual journeys

In ‘normal’ life we tend to fill our days with events, physically moving from one place to the next or physically connecting to other people.  Now there is less of that but it opens up time for something we’re not so used to doing anymore on a daily base: to really connect to ourselves. Time to really process events of the past, our actions, time to pray, meditate, or connect in other spiritual ways.  And in the same way connect to others spiritually.

I saw a movie on Facebook today of a woman who said goodbye to her dying husband, who she wasn’t allowed to visit in hospital, by singing a beautiful song over the phone. Of course it is extremely sad that she wasn’t allowed near him physically but looking at death as passing to other spheres it is beautiful at the same time that she was able to connect to him as a spiritual being with her soul and her voice. Like she probably still does now.

It’s something I have experienced the past few weeks while sharing songs that I just feel like I need to sing (for myself in the first place) on my YouTube channel:  connecting with new people, new colleague musicians, getting lovely feedback from people in other countries who sometimes share personal stories,  deepening friendships with old friends abroad and more. It opens up so much space to focus on these energetic connections without moving around all the time. And we wouldn’t even need the phone or internet for that. We can do it all alone in our houses. But we need time and a quiet mind for it.

Maybe we don’t usually have enough time to deeply and spiritually process everything that is happening. But isn’t that sometimes worth more than another physical visit or journey to here or there? We’re all here temporary and life is fragile but that deep feeling of love, connection, God, spirit, energy, however you wanna call it, will always be there, even if you get sick yourself, or if your beloved people are away physically or not on earth anymore. So maybe we should take more time to focus on it, train it, and appreciate it more.  Be quiet and enjoy! Happy Easter to all of you!

 

 

Back to basics

Talking about the disastrous effects of our Western lifestyle, our eating, shopping and holiday habits on the planet is never fun. People don’t like to be made felt bad about their choices. I’ve been a vegetarian since I was a student but for same reason I’m certainly not one of those veggies who tells you off about the ‘dead animal on your plate’ in the middle of a restaurant. But by now we’ve reached a point with climate and environmental issues that I’m wondering if maybe we should. Is it really OK when friends announce their fifth mini hols a year by plane? And is it OK to just reply asking if they had a good time and what the weather was like?

I remember earning a lot of money each month as a lawyer and I sometimes I hadn’t got a clue how to spend it. I think many fulltime workers who go clothes shopping on a Saturday often don’t. It seems more of a cultural habit. Sometimes I randomly bought shoes, and then I just threw them in some closet if I didn’t want to wear them, and went to buy a new pair I didn’t really need. It gave me a very empty feeling.

Sometime after quitting this job I left to Ireland with my guitar and ended up on a farm in the wild West. My main concerns were to light the fire in the mornings, to collect drinking water from a well in the mountains (rural area’s often still don’t have access to public water schemes), to do repairs after power cuts and some more very basic life tasks, like baking fresh bread in the morning. Strangely this largely improved my mood and feeling of happiness about life in general.  It felt like for the first time in my life – in my twenties – I lived and worked for what really matters, staying alive, keeping warm and being as self sufficient as possible doing so and spend my little savings on local activities that felt like “really earned”.

Of course I wouldn’t want to project my own experience on society in general. But could I assume that our general Western lifestyle has drifted so far off from a basic self sufficient experience, that knowing ‘what really counts in life’ is just as hard a notion to grasp as knowing ‘what we are doing wrong’ ? Is that why it’s so hard to admit that maybe that 5th mini break away or buying that car to bring the kids to school wasn’t really necessary? Because we really don’t feel anymore what is truly valuable? Because our lives are built around an existence in which we study hard to earn digital abstract credits to buy stuff from, striving for more and more, overlooking if we do really add the same amount of value in return with our work? What is an experience really “earned”? It would be good to leave the notion of money out of this equation now when we judge our own behaviour and what we really deserve….

See you on Friday for the Climate Strike in The Hague!

 

Minimalism 

The past week my house has been renovated. A big operation for which I needed to pack up all my stuff. It really reminded me of moving houses, something which I have done 16 times in my life already. I think you would all agree moving houses always feels like a big hassle that causes a lot of stress. So it does for me. As a creative my head is so full of ideas already that I very much dislike things around me also being out of place.

What’s the stress about though? Mainly about our belongings. I have been hiding this week at my parents’ house in the middle of the woods. I only brought my guitar and a small rucksack and quickly I started to relax, and just letting go off the renovation situation in my house in The Hague.

Back in 2007 when I left to Ireland after quitting my lawyer job, I moved all my belongings to a storage space. I only lived out of three suitcases for those three years in Ireland, in several furnished houses. When I came back to The Netherlands I decided to throw out as much as I could from the storage since I hadn’t missed these things anyway.

Since then I have had a natural dislike to buying things, especially big things like a piano or a surfboard! If you have ever travelled you know big things mean more weight to carry along in your backpack…or in your life….

I never chose to live a minimalistic lifestyle but it just somehow happened naturally this way. Living from a lower budget I started making more conscious decisions on buying things and not just throwing out things that are still very well usable. My current stage outfit for the castle tour (pictured below) is a dress I bought at the age of 17 for the highschool prom, that still fits perfectly at 35!!

I mean it when I say I really don’t miss anything. I don’t think I dress that badly either and people often compliment me with the cozy interior of my house. Wouldn’t living from a lower budget be good for all of us? I think it’s much more in line with our real ‘earthly budget’ anyway! Do you think of your footprint and sustainability when buying things?